time-for-maps:

Venice map. [5800 × 4060]

time-for-maps:

Venice map. [5800 × 4060]

(via concepturbanization)

@1 week ago with 59 notes
art-and-things-of-beauty:

David Roberts (1796-1864) - Petra’s Treasury, Jordan. 1839.

art-and-things-of-beauty:

David Roberts (1796-1864) - Petra’s Treasury, Jordan. 1839.

(via catonhottinroof)

@4 weeks ago with 392 notes
humanoidhistory:

Hangar One under construction at Moffet Field in Mountain View, California, 1933. It’s one of the world’s largest freestanding structures, covering 8 acres.

humanoidhistory:

Hangar One under construction at Moffet Field in Mountain View, California, 1933. It’s one of the world’s largest freestanding structures, covering 8 acres.

(via dhmvintageviews)

@4 weeks ago with 436 notes
@4 weeks ago with 546 notes
@4 weeks ago with 305 notes
@4 weeks ago with 4590 notes
speciesbarocus:

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont - The arcades along the main street in Morella, Spain (1928).

speciesbarocus:

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont - The arcades along the main street in Morella, Spain (1928).

(Source: National Geographic, via herrmerrifield)

@4 weeks ago with 243 notes
@4 weeks ago with 2911 notes
alveoliphotography:

Iridule. March, 2014.
Victoria Sans x Alveoli Photography
Reblogging OK with all notes intact.

alveoliphotography:

Iridule. March, 2014.

Victoria Sans x Alveoli Photography

Reblogging OK with all notes intact.

(via tulullabelle)

@1 week ago with 415 notes

opusmetrico:

wherearchitectureisfunWAÏF: Healthy Hedonism

The Sutro Baths

The Sutro Baths were a large, privately owned swimming pool complex in San Francisco, California, built in the late 19th century. The building housing the baths burned down in 1966 and was abandoned.

On March 14, 1896, the Sutro Baths were opened to the public as the world’s largest indoor swimming pool establishment. The baths were built on the sleepy western side of San Francisco by wealthy entrepreneur and former mayor of San Francisco (1894–1896), Adolph Sutro. The vast glass, iron, wood, and reinforced concrete structure was mostly hidden, and filled a small beach inlet below the Cliff House, also owned by Adolph Sutro at the time. Both the Cliff House and the former baths site are now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and operated by the United States National Park Service.

A visitor to the baths not only had a choice of seven different swimming pools—one fresh water and six salt water baths ranging in temperatures—but could also visit a museum displaying Sutro’s large and varied personal collection of artifacts from his travels, a concert hall, seating for 8,000, and, at one time, an ice skating rink. During high tides, water would flow directly into the pools from the nearby ocean, recycling the two million US gallons (7,600 m³) of water in about an hour. During low tides, a powerful turbine water pump, built inside a cave at sea level, could be switched on from a control room and could fill the tanks at a rate of 6,000 US gallons a minute (380 L/s), recycling all the water in five hours.

The baths were once serviced by a rail line, the Ferries and Cliff House Railroad, which ran along the cliffs of Lands End overlooking the Golden Gate. The route ran from the baths to a terminal at California Street and Central Avenue.

Adolph Sutro

San Francisco. 1896

Source: 1 / 2

@4 weeks ago with 207 notes
70sscifiart:

Robert McCall

70sscifiart:

Robert McCall

(Source: , via cl0ser2thesun)

@4 weeks ago with 770 notes
@4 weeks ago with 1325 notes
wasbella102:

Mac Stevenson
jimbargas:

wasbella102:

Mac Stevenson

jimbargas:

@4 weeks ago with 149 notes

johnmccoypottery:

Wood fired bottles by John McCoy Pottery.

www.etsy.com/shop/JohnMcCoyPottery

(via fired-earth)

@4 weeks ago with 67 notes
@4 weeks ago with 283 notes